Dean Koontz

Brother Odd * Dean Koontz * Odd Thomas Series

Loop me in, odd one. The words, spoken in the deep of night by a sleeping child, chill the young man watching over her. For this was a favorite phrase of Stormy Llewellyn, his lost love, and Stormy is dead, gone forever from this world. In the haunted halls of the isolated monastery where he had sought peace, Odd Thomas is stalking spirits of an infinitely darker nature.

In this world where too many are willing to see only the light that is visible, never the Light Invisible, we have a daily darkness that is night, and we encounter another darkness from time to time that is death, the deaths of those we love, but the third and most constant darkness that is with us every day, at all hours of every day, is the darkness of the mind, the pettiness and meanness and hatred, which we have invited into ourselves, and which we pay out with generous interest. 

Through two New York Times bestselling novels Odd Thomas has established himself as one of the most beloved and unique fictional heroes of our time. Now, wielding all the power and magic of a master storyteller at the pinnacle of his craft, Dean Koontz follows Odd into a singular new world where he hopes to make a fresh beginning—but where he will meet an adversary as old and inexorable as time itself.

St. Bartholomew’s Abbey sits in majestic solitude amid the wild peaks of California’s high Sierra, a haven for children otherwise abandoned, and a sanctuary for those seeking insight. Odd Thomas has come here to learn to live fully again, and among the eccentric monks, their other guests, and the nuns and young students of the attached convent school, he has begun to find his way. The silent spirits of the dead who visited him in his earlier life are mercifully absent, save for the bell-ringing Brother Constantine and Odd’s steady companion, the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll.

It was a fun mix of “I see dead people,” Catholicism, Quantum smoke and mirrors, and mad scientist egoism. I love the compassion and respect Koontz brings to the perspective of people who are generally dismissed in our culture as broken or flawed.   In Brother Odd, there’s an abundance of quirky characters you can grow to love and worry about. Each one is unique. Most do not even require dialogue tags because Dean fleshes out their tones and deliveries so well.  The most remarkable quality of this book, though, is the humor. I received many a strange look from my wife during spontaneous outbursts of laughter.

Mr. Thomas, any scientist will tell you that in nature many systems appear to be chaotic, but when you study them long enough, strange order always underlies the appearance of chaos.

The climax of this book was very disappointing. It lasted approximately 1 and 1/2 pages out of the 430 pages of the book. It was over so quickly as to be anti-climatic. There was a huge buildup fortifying the monastery against the evil forces, bringing together the Brothers and all their make-shift weapons, protecting the children at all costs, and then, bang. One shot and its all over. It was way to simple and quick of an ending for me.

And the actual ending of the book, with Odd getting out of the car and walking away with his ghost dog (too cliche for me) and Elvis, I thought Dean Koontz was making a mockery of Odd, reducing him from a full, three dimensional character whom I felt deeply for to a puppet, stringing him and me along for more books, more money, more more for Mr. Koontz.

This book was great, or more to the point, exactly what I was expecting and enjoyed and wanted to read, until chapter 48, or page 370. Then the last 60 pages of the book disappointed me and made me feel slighted and manipulated by Mr. Koontz

About the Author

Dean Koontz is an international household name, a brilliantly gifted storyteller whose books have been bestsellers in many countries, selling seventeen million copies each year. Born and raised in Pennsylvania, he lives with his wife Gerda and their dog Anna in southern California But trouble has a way of finding Odd Thomas, and it slinks back onto his path in the form of the sinister bodachs he has met previously, the black shades who herald death and disaster, and who come late one December night to hover above the abbey’s most precious charges. For Odd is about to face an enemy who eclipses any he has yet encountered, as he embarks on a journey of mystery, wonder, and sheer suspense that surpasses all that has come before.

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