Stephen King

Stephen King – The Lawnmower Man

mv5bywzhoddkmtetmzbmny00nzu5lwizyjmtytkwnwe3ytrjotzkxkeyxkfqcgdeqxvymtqxnzmzndi-_v1_ux182_cr00182268_al_This is one of those Stephen King novels that from 30 odd pages got turned into a 1h movie. A bad one as well! Really creepy. NOTE: This story has absolutely nothing to do with the movie; King had to sue to get his name taken off the title.

One summer, Harold Parkette is in need of a new lawn mowing service. The summer before, a neighbor’s cat was accidentally killed when another neighbor’s dog chased it under the mower. Harold has been putting off hiring new help for the summer, but when he sees an ad for a mowing service he calls. A van reading “Pastoral Greenery” soon pulls up to Parkette’s home. The man working for the service, a hairy, pot-bellied fellow, is shown the overgrown back lawn and is hired. Harold is enjoying a rest as he reads the paper, wondering about the lawnmower man mentioning Circe, when he hears the lawnmower outside. Startled, he races to the back porch and sees the lawnmower running by itself and the naked lawnmower man following it on all fours and eating the grass. The lawnmower seemingly deliberately chases and kills a mole and Harold faints.

I liked the build at the beginning, However, the Lawnmower man himself was just plain amusing!

As soon as the man is out of sight, Harold desperately calls the police, but is interrupted by the lawnmower man, who reveals his boss’s name: Pan. The lawnmower briefly chases Harold through his living room before brutally slaughtering him.

When the police arrive, they conclude that Parkette was murdered and dismembered by a schizophrenic sex maniac.

As they leave, the scent of freshly cut grass hangs strongly in the air.

Did you know? The lovely scent of cut grass is the reek of plant anguish: When attacked, plants release airborne chemical compounds. Now scientists say plants can use these compounds almost like language, notifying nearby creatures who can “rescue” them from insect attacks.

 

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