Book Reviews

Ain’t She Sweet * Susan Elizabeth Phillips

Ain’t She Sweet? Not exactly . . .

The girl everybody loves to hate has returned to the town she’d sworn to leave behind forever. As the rich, spoiled princess of Parrish, Mississippi, Sugar Beth Carey had broken hearts, ruined friendships, and destroyed reputations. But fifteen years have passed, and life has taught Sugar Beth its toughest lessons. Now she’s come home–broke, desperate, and too proud to show it.

She’s sassy, with a good head on her shoulders and a beautiful soul inside.

“It runs in the family. And don’t expect me to be ashamed. Yankees lock away loony relatives, but down here, we prop ’em up on parade floats and march ’em through the middle of town.”

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Sugar Beth

The people of Parrish don’t believe in forgive and forget. When the Seawillows, Sugar Beth’s former girlfriends, get the chance to turn the tables on her, they don’t hesitate. And Winnie Davis, Sugar Beth’s most bitter enemy, intends to humiliate her in the worst possible way.

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The Seawillows. Beautiful and deadly serious when it comes to revenge

Then there’s Colin Byrne. . . . Fifteen years earlier, Sugar Beth had tried to ruin his career. Now he’s rich, powerful, and the owner of her old home. Even worse, this modern-day dark prince is planning exactly the sort of revenge best designed to bring a beautiful princess to her knees.

“Colin : “Perhaps now is the time to tell you that I have a weakness for agreeable women.”

Sugar Beth : “Well, that sure does leave me out.”

Colin : “Exactly. With agreeable women, I’m unendingly considerate. Gallant even.”

Sugar Beth : “But with tarts like me, the gloves are off, is that it?”

Colin : “I wouldn’t exactly call you a tart. But then, I tend to be broad-minded.”

She suppressed the urge to dump her porridge in his lap.”

But none of them have reckoned on the unexpected strength of a woman who’s learned survival the hard way.

While Sugar Beth’s battered heart struggles to overcome old mistakes, Colin must choose between payback and love. Does the baddest girl in town deserve a second chance, or are some things beyond forgiving?

Ain’t She Sweet? is a story of courage and redemption. . . of friendship and laughter. . . of love and the possibility of happily-ever-after.

What I loved: The most important lesson. Beware of who you want to become and never pick on people weaker than you. Sugar Beth was a real bully – something out of a Carrie movie. She has done some real emotional damage to people and while I understand that she had Daddy issues, she could have tried harder to get along.

But sometimes, especially in high-school, it’s a war-zone. Survival of the fittest.

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Colin digging a hole.

Colin was also a hunk

“There was something about a man with a shovel, and the sweat on his neck might as well have been chocolate sauce. It wasn’t fair. Brains and brawns should be two separate categories, not bundled into one irresistible package. She needed to pull herself together before she went after him with a spoon. But where to start?”

I would take a hunky male with a strong British Accent any day of the week home to dig a hole in my garden.

Loved the vengeful SeaWillows, the bookshop in town ran by a strong dyke and also how Sugar Beth redeemed herself – sometimes by shamelessly tripping other people and claiming the hero status. I even loved the basset dog – with an attitude.

What I didn’t love so much: Listening to the audiobook I realized (Again) why it’s important to live in big cities where people don’t get into your business and make it their own. Not a problem with the book. A problem with me.

If you want to experience “Wysteria Lane” again (Desperate Housewives), read this book for some true entertainment. I promise you will find at least 4 characters to love and 2 to despise.

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