[Francis] Braceland believed that the causes of mental illness lay in interpersonal relations: “Men do not get mentally sick ‘out of the blue,’, so to speak … their illness or well-being depends on their relations with other men.”
The role of the psychiatrist was therefore to teach people how to live together, in the broadest sense.
Modern psychiatry, he said, no longer focuses entirely upon mental disease, nor the individual as a “mental patient”, but rather it envisages man in the totality of his being and in the totality of his relationships.
Psychiatry, he added, was “an essential part of the overall science of man… One might even say the ideal goal of the psychiatrist is to achieve wisdom”.

American Psychosis: How the Federal Government Destroyed the Mental Illness …
By E. Fuller Torrey

Francis James Braceland.
Born in Philadelphia in 1900, Frank Braceland was, quintessentially, a
20th-century man, and as such, his life- the hardships he encountered, the
challenges he accepted, the successes he realized and, most important, the
optimism and the energy he embodied-predicted the development of the
profession to which he would dedicate his life.

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