Book Reviews

A dog’s purpose * W. Bruce Cameron

A must-read for dog lovers all over the world.
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This is the remarkable story of one endearing dog’s search for his purpose over the course of several lives. More than just another charming dog story, A Dog’s Purpose touches on the universal quest for an answer to life’s most basic question: Why are we here?

Surprised to find himself reborn as a rambunctious golden-haired puppy after a tragically short life as a stray mutt, Bailey’s search for his new life’s meaning leads him into the loving arms of 8-year-old Ethan. During their countless adventures Bailey joyously discovers how to be a good dog.

But this life as a beloved family pet is not the end of Bailey’s journey. Reborn as a puppy yet again, Bailey wonders—will he ever find his purpose?

Heartwarming, insightful, and often laugh-out-loud funny, A Dog’s Purpose is not only the emotional and hilarious story of a dog’s many lives, but also a dog’s-eye commentary on human relationships and the unbreakable bonds between man and man’s best friend. This moving and beautifully crafted story teaches us that love never dies, that our true friends are always with us, and that every creature on earth is born with a purpose.

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Bruce Cameron has brought forth a magnificent, touching piece of a soul’s journey through life in search of purpose and meaning. At times hilarious and yet other times heart breaking, Bruce brilliantly weaves a story of a dog and its quest that is told with such heart and humanity that anyone who has ever had a dog (or any pet , for that matter) feels that this truly is how they see us and the world in which they live.
The humor is real and effortless. You will find yourself laughing out loud. You will also cry. Real tears born out of your life’s memories of pets past and the essential intertwining of souls that exists in no other relationship.
That bond (from the dog’s perspective) is what brings the true love in this novel to life.
Though many dream of writing that one great novel, the difference here is that Bruce Cameron has done it right out of the gate and I have a feeling that there is plenty more where that came from. An essential, five star must read.


About the author

W. Bruce Cameron

W.-Bruce-Cameron-with-Tucker-2011

I was born in Petoskey, Michigan and for a long time it looked like that would be my most impressive life accomplishment. Nothing distinguished me from other children save the fact that I occasionally stuck peas up my nose and had to visit the emergency room. The third time I did this they x-rayed my skull, perhaps looking to see if there was anything inside my brain besides vegetables.
Other boys wanted to be ball players, astronauts, and soldiers, except for a guy named Pauly who always talked about growing up to be a dancer. (This was sort of a tough thing for third graders to understand, but I think I get it now.) I never wanted to be any of these things, I wanted to be a writer. I actually sat down in fourth grade to write a novel and made it through 26 pages before my hand gave out. It was about a boy who grew up in “a small town in Chicago.” (I didn’t actually know what Chicago was.)
When I was 16 years old, the worst thing happened: I sold the very first short story I ever submitted anywhere. The Kansas City Star paid me $ 50.00, which sadly remained the most I was ever paid for a story until around 1995. It was the worst thing because it convinced me this writing thing was going to be really easy. I went to college at Westminster College, where I majored in beer. I was the editor of the literary magazine and the student newspaper, which, contrary to my expectations, did not lead to a greater incidence of sexual intercourse.
I staggered out of college and became a freelance writer. This didn’t pay for much of anything, so I embarked on a course which was to set the pattern for my writing life: I got a day job to support my writing habit. In my life, I’ve driven an ambulance; repossessed cars; sold life insurance, wine making equipment, and men’s clothing; programmed computers, and analyzed financial statements. I’ve had titles like Collection Manager, Director of Operations, Director of Human Resources, VP of Sales, and, my all time favorite, Chief Knowledge Officer. I’ve worked for small companies like General Motors and weird ones like Resume Network America.
And through it all, I wrote. I started getting up at 4:30 AM in order to write before heading off to my day job.
In 1995, two things happened. First, I decided that after eight unpublished novels I was simply never going to be published, not ever, and that as I started book number nine might as well write something for myself, a novel that was intended strictly for my own consumption. As I wrote it, I found something interesting: it was funny. Apparently, when I stopped writing to sell and just wrote from my own voice, it made me laugh. Also in 1995 I started an on-line Internet column. I began it with six subscribers, four of whom were related to me or were me. I asked people to pass it along to others if they liked it, and they did. At its peak, the Cameron Column had 40,000 subscribers in 52 countries, if you count Texas as a country.
I showed my columns to the Rocky Mountain News and in 1998 they began featuring me weekly in their Home Front section. Before long I was considered one of their most popular columnists, even more of a reader favorite than the woman who wrote about birds, though not as popular as the one who wrote about wine, oddly enough. I use the past tense because the Rocky Mountain News is now out of business, I am so, so sad to say.
Meanwhile, that book I wrote for myself turned out to be a sprawling, unreadable novel, funny but way too long. It should never be published, but when I showed it to Jody Rein of Jody Rein Books, she loved the writing and asked me what else I had. I told her about a column I’d written, “8 Simple Rules for Dating my Teenage Daughter,” and she suggested we turn it into a book proposal.
Oliver North (bet you didn’t see this coming!) took an interest in 8 Simple Rules for Dating my Teenage Daughter because he has a teenage daughter. He had me on his radio show and introduced me to Creator’s Syndicate, which picked me up in October 2001.
Meanwhile, I’ve been doing some public speaking. I’m not a stand up… well, I can stand up, I have two legs and everything, but I mean I am more of a corporate speaker than the type of person you would see in a night club or any place where popular people hang out.
I am the author of two other humor books: How to Remodel a Man, and 8 Simple Rules for Marrying my Daughter.
I have three children about whom I write frequently in my columns. They hate it.
I love dogs and my new book is about a dog: A Dog’s Purpose, which is a NY Times bestselling novel.
I am divorced and in a serious relationship, though it doesn’t seem all that serious since we spend most of our time laughing. We’re engaged to be married but I haven’t closed the deal yet and I’m anxious she may come to her senses before I get her served with the legal paperwork.

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