Dean Koont’z Relentless

When an author is plagued by his worst critic, he tries his best to escape his deadly review. Get in another thrilling story from the master of chases, Dean Koontz.

relentless

The stunning new thriller from one of the world’s bestselling authors. Hostile reviews may have hastened the deaths of some writers, but Cubby Greenwich is made of sterner stuff. At least this is what he tells himself, meanwhile obsessing about the scathing review of his latest bestseller by Shearman Waxx in a national newspaper.

Dean Koontz
Dean Koontz

A feared and therefore revered critic, Waxx has an aura of mystery about him that has carried him far as an arbiter of taste, but the mystery itself is about to break cover. In an unexpected encounter with Waxx, Cubby says one innocent word, but it is the wrong word, and it seems to trigger an inhuman fury in the critic, who becomes bent on destroying Cubby and everything he loves. For it soon becomes apparent that Waxx is not merely a ferocious literary enemy, but a ruthless sociopath. When Cubby finally learns the truth, can he save himself and his family from the appalling danger they are in? The terror has only just begun!

Jules’ Review

5 stars
I always loved books with a good pace and a good lovely vibe. And a psychotic serial killer who wants to reform the world. But not the Dexter Morgan type..
I got this book on a special offer and I loved it from the beginning. The characters are well built, rounded, and I could see much of Dean Koontz himself in the akward author in love with his wife, loving his funny dog with a strange power.
From my knowledge, Dean Koontz does not have a kid, but if he did, he would be the same as Milo, a small “Einstein” with the brain and “PERSEVERENCE” to attain anything.

The story starts with a bad review of Cubby’s latest book done by Waxx who, according to the Wikipedia that Milo read, was an “enema” (meant enigma). Now, this dude, he’s not very fond of authors that do not fit his model of a new world (spoiler alert: his mother’s model of a new world). And he goes off to kill them in horrific ways, some of them explained throughout the book (although I do appreciate Dean Koontz holding back the gore when it came to the murder description of the two girls). I do NOT want to know how kiddies are murdered.

With a single word and a lot of premeditated work, he brings Doom to Cubby’s life, putting all of them into mortal danger.
The flee to live theme is visible again as in many of Dean Koontz’s books and also the witty and ever so wonderful dialog between the cuple.
I so wish my conversations with my lover were as witty as this.

This is a thing I’ve learned: Even with a gun to my head, I am capable of being convulsed with laughter. I am not sure what this extreme capacity for mirth says about me. You’ll have to decide for yourself.

Favourite parts The strong women present in these books. First Vivien, then Penny’s mother and then Penny herself. All know how to use a gun and think vegetarianism is for pussies.
I also loved the funny teleporting dog and Milo’s power of thought.
And the explanations of the names used. Wilfred was one of my favourites.
Least favourite parts: I’m not a critic by far, but I thought the ending was too short. I wanted more. Maybe this is a good thing. And mentioning that atrocity was created in an artificial way, made me think of Dean Koontz’ Frankenstein series. Maybe they all melt together somehow.

Relentless is not at all what you would call a realistic thriller, what with an organisation dedicated to destroying people who don’t write the sort of books they approve of, and a couple of unexplained science-fiction elements that don’t quite seem to fit in (teleporting dogs, anyone?) But it was great fun to read, genre boundary-breaking, a mixture of intelligence and incredulity. I shall certainly be reading Koontz again.
Get it from Amazon

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s